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Posts for: April, 2020

AdvancedEquipmentandSafePracticesEnsureX-RaySafetyforChildren

When it comes to our children’s safety, there isn’t much nowadays that isn’t under scrutiny. Whether food, clothing, toys and more, we ask the same question: can it be harmful to children?

That also includes tried and true healthcare practices. One in particular, the routine x-ray, has been an integral part of dental care for nearly a century. As a means for detecting tooth decay much earlier than by sight, it has without a doubt helped save billions of teeth.

But is it safe for children? The reason to ask is because x-rays are an invisible form of electromagnetic radiation that can penetrate human tissue. As with other forms of radiation, elevated or frequent exposure to x-rays could damage tissue and increase the future risk of cancer.

But while there is potential for harm, dentists take great care to never expose patients, especially children, to that level or frequency of radiation. They incorporate a number of safeguards based on a principle followed by all healthcare professionals in regard to x-rays called ALARA, an acronym for “as low as reasonably achievable.” This means dentists and physicians use as low an exposure of x-ray energy as is needed to achieve a reasonable beneficial outcome. In dentistry, that’s identifying and treating tooth decay.

X-ray equipment advances are a good example of ALARA in action. Digital imaging, which has largely replaced film, requires less x-ray radiation for the same results than its older counterpart. Camera equipment has also become more efficient, with modern units containing lower settings for children to ensure the proper amount of exposure.

Dentists are also careful how often they take x-ray images with their patients, only doing so when absolutely necessary. As a result, dental patients by and large experience lower dosages of x-ray radiation in a year than they receive from natural radiation background sources found every day in the environment.

Dentists are committed to using x-ray technology in as safe and beneficial a way as possible. Still, if you have concerns please feel free to discuss it further with your dental provider. Both of you have the same goal—that your children have both healthy mouths and healthy bodies for the rest of their lives.

If you would like more information on x-ray safety for children, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “X-Ray Safety for Children.”


By D Casey Hart DDS
April 23, 2020
Category: Oral Health
Tags: Oral Care  

Here’s how you should (and shouldn’t) be caring for your teeth and gums.

While cavities and gum disease are incredibly common, did you know that these dental problems are preventable? Visiting our Marietta, GA, dentists Drs. Casey and Thomas Hart twice a year for cleanings will certainly go a long way to promoting a healthy smile; however, it’s your habits, routine and lifestyle that really promote healthy teeth and gums. It’s up to you to maintain good oral hygiene.

Here are some simple things you can do from home to reduce your risk for gum disease and tooth decay,

  • Brush your teeth twice a day with a soft-bristled toothbrush and an ADA-approved fluoride toothpaste. Make sure you are brushing your teeth for at least two minutes each time you brush.
  • Know when to replace your toothbrush head (you’ll be able to tell just by looking at it). This should happen as soon as the bristles splay out (about every couple of months). If you’ve just recently gotten over an illness this is another reason to replace your toothbrush right away.
  • Flossing your teeth is just as important as brushing and yet, only about 37 percent of Americans surveyed said that they actually floss every day. If you want to prevent cavities between teeth and protect against gum disease, then you should be flossing your teeth every day.
  • If the idea of using traditional floss and flossing techniques has you apprehensive, then consider other options such as a disposable flossing pick or an oral irrigation device, which uses water to clean between teeth. If you aren’t sure which flossing option is right for you, your Marietta, GA, family dentist can provide suggestions.
  • Quitting smoking as soon as possible. If you are using tobacco products of any kind this can cause serious and long-term damage to your oral health. The good news is that you will see an almost immediate improvement in your oral health after quitting.
  • Avoid sugar, starches and processed foods, which can increase your risk for tooth decay. While these treats can be enjoyable in moderation, they can also increase plaque buildup. You should be following a balanced, whole diet full of vegetables, lean protein (think fish and chicken instead of bacon and lunch meats), whole grains, fruits, and dairy (low-fat is ideal).

Due to Covid-19, our Marietta, GA, dentists and their team will not be providing routine checkup and dental care right now; however, if you are dealing with a dental emergency, we are able to help you get the care you need. If you have a true emergency, please call (770) 926-8371. We want you to stay healthy and safe, and to keep practicing good at-home oral care during this time!


By D Casey Hart DDS
April 14, 2020
Category: Oral Health
Tags: mouthguards  
BruinsZdenoCharaBreaksHisJawDuring2019StanleyCup

Boston Bruins defenseman Zdeno Chara had a rough Stanley Cup final against the St. Louis Blues this past June. Not only did the Bruins ultimately lose the championship, but Chara took a deflected puck shot to the face in Game Four that broke his jaw.

With the NHL season now over, the 42-year-old Bruins captain continues to mend from his injury that required extensive treatment. His experience highlights how jaw fractures and related dental damage are an unfortunate hazard in hockey—not only for pros like Chara, but also for an estimated half million U.S. amateurs, many in youth leagues.

Ice hockey isn't the only sport with this injury potential: Basketball, football (now gearing up with summer training) and even baseball players are also at risk. That's why appropriate protective gear like helmets and face shields are key to preventing injury.

For any contact sport, that protection should also include a mouthguard to absorb hard contact forces that could damage the mouth, teeth and gums. The best guards (and the most comfortable fit) are custom-made by a dentist based on impressions made of the individual's mouth.

But even with adequate protection, an injury can still happen. Here's what you should do if your child has an injury to their jaw, mouth or teeth.

Recognize signs of a broken jaw. A broken jaw can result in severe pain, swelling, difficulty speaking, numbness in the chin or lower lip or the teeth not seeming to fit together properly. You may also notice bleeding in the mouth, as well as bruising under the tongue or a cut in the ear canal resulting from jawbone movement during the fracture. Get immediate medical attention if you notice any of these signs.

Take quick action for a knocked-out tooth. A tooth knocked completely out of its socket is a severe dental injury. But you may be able to ultimately save the tooth by promptly taking the following steps: (1) find the tooth and pick it up without touching the root end, (2) rinse it off, (3) place it back in its socket with firm pressure, and (4) see a dentist as soon as possible.

Seek dental care. Besides the injuries already mentioned, you should also see a dentist for any moderate to severe trauma to the mouth, teeth and gums. Leading the list: any injury that results in tooth chipping, looseness or movement out of alignment.

Even a top athlete like Zdeno Chara isn't immune to injury. Take steps then to protect your amateur athlete from a dental or facial injury.

If you would like more information about dealing with sports-related dental injuries, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. To learn more, read the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Athletic Mouthguards” and “The Field-Side Guide to Dental Injuries.”


By D Casey Hart DDS
April 04, 2020
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral health  
FriendlyBacteriaCanHelpProtectOurMouthsFromDisease

If you know anything about dental disease, then you know bacteria ranks high on the Usual Suspects list. Tooth decay gets its start from acid produced by bacteria; periodontal (gum) disease is often triggered by bacteria that infect the gums.

But the particular strains of bacteria that can cause dental disease are a small percentage of the 10,000-plus species inhabiting your mouth. The rest, numbering in the millions, are fairly benign—and some, as recent research is now showing, play a sizeable role in protecting your teeth and gums against other malicious bacteria, fungi and viruses.

Dr. Aaron Weinberg, a dental researcher at Case Western Reserve University, has been investigating these protective bacteria for many years. His research began with a scientific conundrum: although the mouth has one of the highest densities of bacterial populations, wounds in the mouth tend to heal quickly.

The answer, he believes, originates with human beta defensins (hBDs), substances produced by cells in the lining of the mouth that are natural antibiotics against disease. He has found that certain bacteria actually help stimulate their production.

This isn't just an interesting fact about the body's defenses and immune system. During his research, Dr. Weinberg was able to identify the agent within the bacteria that triggered hBD production. This has opened up a new line of research: The possibility that harnessing this agent might help assist in our treatment of infection by boosting the body's defensive capabilities.

For example, researchers have proposed including a form of the agent in toothpaste. Over time, this might stimulate hBD production and guard the mouth against the development of dental diseases like gum disease.

These possibilities all come from our increasing knowledge and understanding of the microscopic world around us, especially in our mouths. Bacteria are much more complex than we may have realized—not all are our enemies, and some are definitely our friends. Learning more may open up new ways to keep our teeth and gums healthy.

If you would like more information on the mouth's healing abilities, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation.